Château Sociando-Mallet
‘Cuvée Jean Gautreau’ 2015
Haut-Medoc, Bordeaux, France

$125.00

Fruit
Earth
Body
Tannin
Acid
Alcohol

Style: Red: Deep, savoury and sophisticated

Producer: Château Sociando-Mallet

Region: Haut-Medoc, Bordeaux, France

Grape: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc

Vintage: 2015

Soil: Mixed

Farming: Sustainable

Oak: French oak

Alcohol: 14%

Glassware: Bordeaux Stem

Decant: 30 minutes prior to drinking (there will be some sediment)

Serving Temperature: 16 – 18°C

The Wine: A deep richness of fruit rises from the glass. Deep cassis, blackcurrent, and purple plum. This is backed by graphite, smoke, tobacco and leather. The palate is fine and elegant, but with concentration and intensity. Tannin still holds strong while the fruit and savoury complecity sweep the palate with grace. Best decanted and served in big glasses.

Sebastian Crowther MS

3 in stock

Producer Profile

Château Sociando-Mallet is in the commune of Saint-Seurin-de-Cadourne, ten kilometres north of Pauillac, in the Haut-Médoc appellation. A document dating from March 1633 refers to land here belonging to an aristocrat of Basque origin named Sociondo. A member of his family was Bishop of Bayonne. Another document, from 1750 mentions vines belonging to Demoiselle Anne de Sossiondo. Due to various misspellings over the years, "Sossiondo" became "Sociando".
The archives show that Guillaume de Brochon, a royalist solicitor who lived at Sociando, was arrested during the French Revolution in 1793. His estate was impounded, sold at auction by the revolutionary government, and acquired by his father-in-law, Jean Lamothe.
In 1831, Marie-Elisabeth Alaret, Lamothe's niece and owner of Sociando, married Achille Mallet, a naval officer. As it was the custom at the time to add one's name to an estate, the château was thereafter known as Sociando-Mallet.
The Alaret family owned Sociando-Mallet until 1878, when it came into the hands of Léon Simon.
Between then and the arrival of Jean Gautreau, the château belonged to: the wine merchant firm of Delor, Louis Roullet (Mayor of Saint-Seurin), and then Emile Tereygeol, who also owned Pontoise-Cabarrus at that time.

Château Sociando-Mallet is in the commune of Saint-Seurin-de-Cadourne, ten kilometres north of Pauillac, in the Haut-Médoc appellation. A document dating from March 1633 refers to land here belonging to an aristocrat of Basque origin named Sociondo. A member of his family was Bishop of Bayonne. Another document, from 1750 mentions vines belonging to Demoiselle Anne de Sossiondo. Due to various misspellings over the years, "Sossiondo" became "Sociando".
The archives show that Guillaume de Brochon, a royalist solicitor who lived at Sociando, was arrested during the French Revolution in 1793. His estate was impounded, sold at auction by the revolutionary government, and acquired by his father-in-law, Jean Lamothe.
In 1831, Marie-Elisabeth Alaret, Lamothe's niece and owner of Sociando, married Achille Mallet, a naval officer. As it was the custom at the time to add one's name to an estate, the château was thereafter known as Sociando-Mallet.
The Alaret family owned Sociando-Mallet until 1878, when it came into the hands of Léon Simon.
Between then and the arrival of Jean Gautreau, the château belonged to: the wine merchant firm of Delor, Louis Roullet (Mayor of Saint-Seurin), and then Emile Tereygeol, who also owned Pontoise-Cabarrus at that time.

Description

Review

Style: Red: Deep, savoury and sophisticated

Producer: Château Sociando-Mallet

Region: Haut-Medoc, Bordeaux, France

Grape: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc

Vintage: 2015

Soil: Mixed

Farming: Sustainable

Oak: French oak

Alcohol: 14%

Glassware: Bordeaux Stem

Decant: 30 minutes prior to drinking (there will be some sediment)

Serving Temperature: 16 – 18°C

The Wine: A deep richness of fruit rises from the glass. Deep cassis, blackcurrent, and purple plum. This is backed by graphite, smoke, tobacco and leather. The palate is fine and elegant, but with concentration and intensity. Tannin still holds strong while the fruit and savoury complecity sweep the palate with grace. Best decanted and served in big glasses.

Sebastian Crowther MS